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Caramelised salsify with carrots recipe

Caramelised salsify with carrots recipe


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When you peel salsify it's important to have a bowl with water and vinegar stand by because they turn black very quickly unless they are put in acidulated water right away.

3 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 250g salsify
  • 250g carrots
  • 1 teaspoon icing sugar
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • salt and pepper
  • grated lemon zest
  • minced fresh parsley

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:20min ›Ready in:30min

  1. Trim, peel and slice salsify. Place in a bowl with cold water and a few tablespoons. Peel carrots and slice.
  2. Heat a non stick frying pan and add sugar. Once it is. hot and changes colour add butter and let it sizzle. Add salsify and carrots and fry, covered, till veg are soft, about 20 minutes.
  3. Add lemon zest, salt and pepper. Sprinkle with parsley and serve.

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From Great British Chefs - Chef Recipes Great British Chefs - Chef Recipes by Steve Horrell

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  • Categories: Grills & BBQ Quick / easy Main course Summer
  • Ingredients: leg of lamb rosemary sprigs lemons fennel kohlrabi cucumbers crème fraîche mint fresh peas broad beans Parmesan cheese mint sprigs salad leaves borage flowers dill courgettes red chillies yellow courgettes


Seasonal Eating in December

Happy December 1st everyone! Honestly, where did November go? Or even more so- where did the Autumn go? I felt like it was just Halloween a blink ago and Christmas is rolling on so quickly!

But now that we’ve entered a new month, it’s time for a new seasonal eating list.

Seasonal Eating in December

Food that is in season in the UK in the Winter (December, January & February):
Fruit: oranges, lemons, dates, bananas, grapefruit, quince, apples, bramley apples, clementines, pomegranate, pears, rhubarb
Vegetables: cauliflower, parsnips, pak choi, swede, turnups, celeriac, cabbage, beetroot, leeks, brussels sprouts, lettuce, purple sprouting broccoli, Jerusalem artichoke, chicory, sweet potato, celery

Food to eat in the UK in December :

beetroot, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, celeriac, chicory, Jerusalem artichokes, kale, kohlrabi, leeks, mushrooms, parsnips, potatoes, salsify, shallots, turnips, swede, celery, spring green cabbage, white cabbage, savoy cabbage, carrots

What are your favourite December recipes?

Personally, I have a spicy brussels sprouts recipe with caramelised onions, lemon juice and pine nuts that makes me salivate every Christmas!

And as a special bonus, anyone who signs up to my newsletter will receive a monthly email about what food is in season and some recipe suggestions to make with that food.

Sign up for my newsletter today to get your December guide shortly!

Do you have any favourite December recipes? Let me know them in the comments!


Seasonal Eating in December

Happy December 1st everyone! Honestly, where did November go? Or even more so- where did the Autumn go? I felt like it was just Halloween a blink ago and Christmas is rolling on so quickly!

But now that we’ve entered a new month, it’s time for a new seasonal eating list.

Seasonal Eating in December

Food that is in season in the UK in the Winter (December, January & February):
Fruit: oranges, lemons, dates, bananas, grapefruit, quince, apples, bramley apples, clementines, pomegranate, pears, rhubarb
Vegetables: cauliflower, parsnips, pak choi, swede, turnups, celeriac, cabbage, beetroot, leeks, brussels sprouts, lettuce, purple sprouting broccoli, Jerusalem artichoke, chicory, sweet potato, celery

Food to eat in the UK in December :

beetroot, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, celeriac, chicory, Jerusalem artichokes, kale, kohlrabi, leeks, mushrooms, parsnips, potatoes, salsify, shallots, turnips, swede, celery, spring green cabbage, white cabbage, savoy cabbage, carrots

What are your favourite December recipes?

Personally, I have a spicy brussels sprouts recipe with caramelised onions, lemon juice and pine nuts that makes me salivate every Christmas!

And as a special bonus, anyone who signs up to my newsletter will receive a monthly email about what food is in season and some recipe suggestions to make with that food.

Sign up for my newsletter today to get your December guide shortly!

Do you have any favourite December recipes? Let me know them in the comments!


Place the salt and sugar into a bowl large enough to contain the water/wine and the chicken, and can fit into your refrigerator.

Mix until all of the ingredients are absorbed into the water.

Immerse the chicken into the brine, and place the bowl into the refrigerator for about three hours.

Chef's Note: What is brining?

Brining meats before cooking them is a very effective way to increase the moisture and tenderness of the meat. Brining is similar to marinating, but uses a simpler liquid for soaking the meat.

The process of soaking meat in salted water causes the meat's cells to absorb some of the water through osmosis, making it moister when cooked.

Sugar, while not essential to a brine, is a useful ingredient. Adding sugar to a brine will increase the amount of caramelization achieved when cooking the chicken.

A good rule of thumb is to add the same amount of sugar by volume as salt.

When it come to brining, kosher and table salt to about the same thing. So why the difference in measurement?
Well, kosher salt has a larger grain than table salt, so there is more air between the salt particles. When you use 1 cup of kosher salt, or 1/2 cut of table salt, you're basically getting the same amount of salt.

Remove the chicken from the brine, and pat dry with paper towels, or a clean kitchen towel, and then season with some salt and pepper.

Chef's Note: If you're using a kitchen towel (my method) make sure that you immediately throw that towel into the wash, and don't use it for anything else.


Frenchie, Covent Garden, London: restaurant review

During his time at Fifteen restaurant, Greg Marchand was nicknamed ‘Frenchie’ by Jamie Oliver, and has so named his bistro in Paris after gaining further experience in New York, London and his hometown of Nantes, France. More recently, Greg has popped back over la Manche to bring his modern French cooking to Covent Garden in his new branch of Frenchie. This chic, two-floor restaurant is an excellent fit in the buzzy West End, with set designer Emilie Bonaventure’s light, bright interiors, exposed brick walls, contemporary lighting and soft leather bench seating.

Bag a soft grey bar stool at the impressive, marble-topped bar and be entertained by Rudi Carraro’s impressive cocktail skills – look up to catch this mixologist, formerly of the Artesian, pouring steady streams of spirits, bitters and syrups from a staggering height. We try Once Upon a Time No.2 – a refreshing mix of Ketel One vodka, Mirabelle plum and citrus with a foamy top and lightly-sparkling Ms. Bubbles, an elegant glass of silky-sweet Tagliatella (aromatic cherry brandy), hazelnut and champagne.

For a party, book the downstairs area and watch Greg and his team whizz around in the open kitchen, creating modern dishes with British produce. The menu is minimalist, with just a few ingredients listed for each dish. A little confusing, the top-line options are snack-sized, beneath which are listed dishes designed for sharing.

We start with bacon scones with clotted cream. One of the smart, charming French waiters tells us it’s a secret recipe, but adds in a whisper that Greg uses only smoked bacon, maple syrup and flour to create these caramelised, salty, bacon-studded snacks. Frenchie Paris’s signature pulled-pig slider is also excellent, sandwiching soft, smoked meat and crunchy red-cabbage coleslaw in a brioche bun.

Mains are made for sharing, but the intricately assembled ingredients in the fairly small portions mean sharing between more than two isn’t practical. Colourful heritage carrots are roasted in a French/Indian spice mix, vadouvan, sweet carrot purée, intense Medjool date paste and springy barley.

Soft Elwy Valley lamb, with perfectly al dente pappardelle, packs a punch of espelette pepper and is lifted with lemon. Linconshire chicken is so tender that we’re convinced it’s cooked sous-vide, but Greg retrieves a whole roast chicken carcass from his pristine open kitchen to prove us wrong, triumphantly. Long, odd-looking salsify glazed with honey provides a bed for the small piece of chicken, and tiny slices of kumquat add sharp sweetness.

Desserts are exceptional, and do ‘deconstructed’ no injustice. Again, the menu doesn’t flatter the food – ‘lemon’ is, in fact, moist lemon polenta cake with sweet honey ice cream. Greg toys with the temperature of the ice cream so that yuzu cream melts over the top and creates a shiny, Hollandaise sauce-like coating. Kalamata olives add a surprising, savoury note ,and a honeycomb-crumb topping gives a sweet crunch.

For something a little more refreshing, try aromatic sorrel sorbet with cubes of Granny Smith apple coated in a salty, sweet crumb, finished with matcha tea powder and meringue pieces, to nod to the Frenchie in Greg. One thing’s for sure, he’s got the balance just right, and we predict that the new Frenchie in town is here to stay.


Roast vegetables

I think this was one of the first recipes I cooked from Jamie Oliver's "Happy days with the Naked Chef", when if first came out. Certainly been making it regularly since then. Rather oddly, I never did get around to adding the recipe here. Time to make amends.

Simply put select the vegetables from your favourites, cut into even sized chunks, oil, season and roast.

You can cook roast potatoes in with the vegetables, but I feel that roast potatoes deserve separate treatment for superior results.

As for quantities, judge what your guests would eat from the raw, prepared quantities, remembering that they will shrink quite a lot after cooking.

Ingredients

  • 6 medium carrots
  • 6 medium parsnips
  • 1 small butternut squash, peeled and cut into chunks, slightly larger than the carrots and parsnips
  • 2 medium onions, peeled, each roughly cut into 6 pieces
  • 6 to 8 Cloves of garlic, if your guests will enjoy the fun of squeezing out the puréed garlic paste over their veg, leave them un peeled, peel them for the more fastidious eaters.
  • Big bunch of thyme
  • Big bunch of rosemary
  • Handful of fresh bay leaves
  • 2 teaspoons whole cumin seeds
  • 1 teaspoon whole fennel seeds
  • 1 teaspoon chili flakes
  • Olive oil

Mise en place

  • Pre heat the oven to 220° C (425° F - gas 7)
  • I've chosen this temperature as it matches the cooking time for roast potatoes. They will do just as well at 180° C (350° F - gas 4), though will take a little longer

Method

  1. Peel and prepare all of the vegetables and cut into equal sized pieces, cut lengthways, not into discs.
  2. Oil a large oven tray
  3. Tip all the vegetables and whole bunches of herbs into the tray, sprinkle with the seasonings, drizzle with a good few glugs of olive oil and mix well with your hands
  4. Cover with tin-foil
  5. Roast, covered, for 30 minutes, remove the foil and toss the vegetables in the oil
  6. Roast for a further 10 to 20 minutes
  7. Remove the woody herbs and serve.

Variations

Other possibilities include:

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#vegetables #roast #parsnips #oliveoil #carrots #roastpotatoes #roastvegetables #herbs #garlic #celeriac #deglaze


Caramelised salsify with carrots recipe - Recipes

By Angela Hartnett
With a title like best end of lamb with pan-fried squash, Puy lentils and a lamb jus you would expect this dish to be impressive – and it is. Great tips from chef Angela Hartnett waltz you through so be ready for applause when you serve.
Serves 6

Takes 2 and a quarter hours to make, plus 15 minutes for the final cooking

Ingredients
2 best ends of lamb on the bone (ask your butcher to cut the fillet of lamb from each best end and chop up the bones for you)
1 tbsp olive oil
1 garlic bulb, halved through the middle, plus 1 extra garlic clove, crushed
6 tbsp vegetable oil
3 carrots
3 sticks celery
2 sprigs fresh rosemary
3 sprigs fresh thyme
10 white peppercorns
5 fresh bay leaves
1 tbsp tomato purèe
½ bottle dry white wine
2.4 litres hot chicken stock, home-made and unsalted, if possible
250g Puy lentils
3 sticks salsify or 1 parsnip
1 butternut squash, about 800-900g
6 very small red onions
100-125g butter
1 savoy cabbage
METHOD
How to make lamb with pan-fried squash
Making the jus (gravy stock)

The difference between a home-made dish and a restaurant meal is often the jus, which is why it is really worth taking the time to make – it has such an intense flavour. You can freeze any leftover jus.

1. Trim the chopped bones and fillet of any excess fat. Set aside. Put the fillet in a glass dish, drizzle with the olive oil and add the crushed garlic clove. Turn to coat in the oil and garlic. Cover and chill until needed.

2. Put the bones and fat trimmings in a large pan with 2 tablespoons of the vegetable oil and fry over a high heat, turning occasionally until browned all over, about 20-30 minutes.

3. Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon of the vegetable oil in another pan and fry 21/2 carrots and 21/2 celery sticks, both diced, the rosemary sprigs, 2 thyme sprigs, the peppercorns, 1 bay leaf, and 1/2 garlic bulb over a high heat for 15 minutes, until caramelised.

4. When the bones have browned, pour off the fat and add the vegetable and herb mixture. Stir in the tomato purèe and cook for 3-4 minutes. Add the wine and stir to deglaze the pan (this means to get all the colour and flavour off the pan into the sauce), then add the stock and bring to the boil for 2-3 minutes. Reduce the heat and simmer for 45 minutes. Strain into a clean pan and discard the solids. Boil rapidly to reduce the sauce by two-thirds until glossy. Taste until you have a good, concentrated lamb flavour. You will end up with 500-600ml of jus. Cool, then chill until the fat sets on the surface. Skim off the fat and discard.

Cook the lentils
5. Put lentils in a pan with the remaining carrot and celery, both roughly cut, thyme, a bay leaf and the remaining 1/2 garlic bulb. Cover with cold water and bring to the boil, then simmer for 25 minutes, until tender. Drain and discard the vegetables, herbs and garlic. Set aside until ready to serve.

Caramelise the vegetables
6. Peel the salsify and cut into 3cm lengths, or peel and cut the parsnip into chunky batons (sticks). Peel and deseed the squash and cut into 1cm thick slices. Peel and cut onions in half. Place 3 pans on the hob, each with 1 tablespoon vegetable oil and a bay leaf. Sautè each vegetable in a separate pan over a medium heat until beginning to brown. Turn the vegetables frequently. Once they have begun to brown, add a tablespoon or 2 of water to deglaze the pan. All the brown juices will help colour the vegetables. Cook for a few minutes more, then add a knob of butter to each. Continue to cook, adding alternate splashes of water and knobs of butter until the vegetables are caramelised and soft when pierced with a knife. The squash and salsify (or parsnip) will take about 8-10 minutes and the onions up to 30-40 minutes. Drain on kitchen paper and set aside.

Cook the lamb
7. Cut each lamb fillet into 3. Add 50g butter to a large frying pan and heat it until foaming and light brown (known as beurre noisette).

8. Add the lamb fillets and sautè for 3 minutes each side until browned, spooning the butter over the lamb all the time. Remove from the pan and rest or chill, until ready to serve.

Buttered cabbage
Remove and discard the cabbage stalks, and shred the leaves as finely as possible. Set aside until ready to serve. Just before serving, melt a knob of butter in a pan. Add the cabbage and a tablespoon or 2 of water. Fry briefly, then cover to steam for 3-4 minutes, so it keeps its colour and is crunchy.

To serve the meal
About 15 minutes before serving, preheat the oven to its highest setting. Spread the lamb and vegetables in a single layer on baking sheets and reheat in the oven for 5 minutes if still warm, or 10 minutes if chilled. Meanwhile, cook the cabbage, and put the jus and lentils on the hob to warm through. Spoon the cabbage onto the plates, slice the lamb and arrange on top, spoon over the lentils and vegetables and serve with the jus.


Charlie's Restaurant

Calamari with smashed peas. Photo: Luis Enrique Ascui

162-170 Queens Parade Fitzroy North , Australia 3068

WHERE AND WHAT

It's a funny stretch, the ''service road'' at the start of Queens Parade where it veers off Alexandra Parade, and surprisingly quiet there's not even much foot traffic, save for locals walking dogs or heading to Edinburgh Gardens.

The recent overhaul of the Marmalade and Soul cafe - formerly the Recreation Hotel - on the corner of Grant Street, might change that. At the newly branded Charlie's Restaurant, former Charcoal Lane chef Andy Bedford has created a modern Australian menu with the odd European touch, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner.

WHERE TO SIT

The casual fit-out includes an open kitchen and a big communal table in the back room that almost feels like a private dining room. Possibly a better option, the seats outside are widely spaced and under the shade of Queens Parade's big plane trees.

Inside Charlie's laid back interior. Photo: Luis Enrique Ascui

WHEN TO GO

Wednesday-Friday, 8am-11pm Saturday, 7.30am-11pm Sunday 7.30am-4pm.

DRINK

The wine list is largely local (Yarra Valley Toolangi chardonnay Clare Valley riesling Margaret River cab merlot) save for some expertly selected internationals, among them a Rias Baixas Albarino and a Rheingau riesling, and has some very affordable drops. There's a good range of beer, too, from Melbourne Bitter through to Bridge Road Pale Ale. Coffee is No Label, from Tanna Island in Vanuatu.

Charlie's is open for breakfast, but it's at lunch and dinner when Bedford's skills come to the fore. The lunch menu has toasted Turkish rolls (starting at $9.50) and the obligatory burger, as well as heartier dishes such as spiced calamari, flash fried and meltingly tender, served with smashed peas, harissa aioli, and a decent sized side salad of coriander, chilli, cucumber and radish, for $19. The classic steak sandwich - huge! - is lifted above your standard steak sanga with thyme-roasted portobello mushrooms, onion jam, bacon and Swiss cheese ($18).

The dinner menu is more ''fine dining'' than the atmosphere suggests - entrees include ham hock and leek tart, broad beans, frissee and quail eggs ($14) and crab, potato and spinach tortellini with lemon, parsley and baby caper beurre noisette ($15). Mains, the most expensive coming in at $31, include fish of the day with potato, mussel and leek broth and caramelised salsify ($27) - a root veg also known as ''vegetable oyster'' - and pan-seared duck breast with fondant potato, heirloom carrots, confit duck parcels and bitter orange sauce ($31). Desserts are worth saving room for: Bedford's banoffee pie ($14) comes with chocolate and lavender mousse (changing soon to chocolate and rosemary) and chewy caramelised bananas.

WHO'S THERE

Families (there's a great kids' menu) and locals stopping in for the $7 cake and coffee deal during the day, and a more varied crowd at night.

WHY BOTHER

Local ingredients and hip-restaurant quality dishes at gastro-pub prices warm, friendly service.


Still in season: Beetroot, Brussels sprouts, butternut squash, carrots, celeriac, celery, chicory, Jerusalem artichokes, kale, onions, parsnips, potatoes, rabbit, red grouse, salsify, swede, apples, clementines, hazelnuts, lychees, red cabbage, pears, pomegranates, pumpkins, satsumas, tangerines, goose, venison, walnuts

Editor’s pick of seasonal recipes: Braised kale with pancetta Honey-fried Parsnips Roast pumpkin, goat cheese and walnuts Caramelised Swede and Cardamom Soup Honey-roast duck with cabbage and smoked bacon Monkfish Thai Green Curry Pan-roasted scallops with rhubarb Steamed Toffee Apple and Date Pudding Tangerine and Frangipane Tart

SEASONAL RECIPE VIDEO: watch Anjum Anand make her Tandoori monkfish