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Arya's Snitched Tarts

Arya's Snitched Tarts


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These tarts take a while to make, but they are worth every minute. The pastries look like one could easily overindulge, but each small shortbread cookie is a commitment. The fruit syrup is heavy and chewy; our British readers may recognize this dessert as the medieval ancestor of the Jammie Dodger.

Ingredients

  • 1 bottle inexpensive sweet red wine, such as a Shiraz
  • 1½ Cup honey
  • ½ Cup red wine vinegar
  • ½ Cup red wine vinegar
  • ½ Cup chopped dates or prunes
  • ½ Cup currants
  • 1 Cup fresh or dried fi gs, if available (if not, substitute your favorite berries), diced
  • 1 batch sweet dough
  • Vegetable oil for frying

Servings50

Calories Per Serving123

Folate equivalent (total)15µg4%


Game of Thrones: Honey Biscuits from The South

Honestly, I haven&apost gotten a chance to watch this week&aposs episode of "Game of Thrones" yet (thank goodness for HBO Go!) - so no spoilers please! But one thing that is sure not to spoil are these delicious Honey Biscuits from A Feast of Ice and Fire. They&aposre featured in the cookbook&aposs section on "The South," which also includes tasty-sounding delicacies like "Stewed Rabbit," "Arya&aposs Snitched Tarts," and "Sister&aposs Stew." The Honey Biscuits originally appeared in A Clash of Kings, the second book in the series "A Song of Ice and Fire":

"For the sweet, Lord Caswell&aposs servants brought down trays of pastries from his castle kitchens, cream swans and spun-sugar unicorns, lemon cakes in the shape of roses, spiced honey biscuits and blackberry tarts, apple crisps and wheels of buttery cheese."

Like many of the other recipes in the cookbook, authors Chelsea Monroe-Cassel and Sariann Lehrer included both a "medieval" version and a "modern" version. I went with the medieval version, whose original 14th century recipe goes like this:

"Crispels. Take and make a foile of gode past as thynne as paper kerue it out wyt a saucer & frye it in oile oper in grece and be remnaunt, take hony clarified and flamme perwith. Alye hem vp and serue hem forth."

Got that? Me neither. Essentially these medieval honey biscuits are made from a simple pastry dough that&aposs been rolled out flat, cut into biscuit-size circles, and lightly fried in oil, then brushed with warm honey and dusted with cinnamon. Mmmmmmm.

Brent and I enjoyed these sweet treats alongside a bowl of Hungarian Venison Stew, rice, and Southern-style collard greens, and they easily stole the dinner show.

Check back next Monday for another recipe from A Feast of Ice and Fire!


Sunday, 5 April 2015

Stuffed Grape Leaves from Dorne - GoT Countdown

"The kid had been roasted with lemon and honey. With it were grape leaves stuffed with a melange of raisins, onions, mushrooms and fiery dragon peppers. 'I am not hungry,' Arianne said. After a while, hunger weakened her resolve, so she sat and ate." - A Feast For Crows

Good Afternoon sweetlings,

Only a week to go! I am very very eager for the week to pass so the start of season 5 can begin.

When I first got this book I was excited to see a chapter on Dorne, it sounds like such a beautiful place and from the characters we have seen so far on the show (Oberyn and Ellaria) it also seems an open minded, and exotic place. I can just tell when we finally see it on screen it will be amazing.

The dishes in this chapter such as 'chick pea paste', 'flatbread' and 'lemonsweet' seem to be heavily influenced by Mediterranean foods, in particular Greek and Turkish based. All very aromatic and fresh tasting. I imagine they would taste even better in the sun, as opposed to curled up on a sofa while you hear crashing rain outside the window!

I thoroughly enjoyed making this dish because it was something very new to me, working with ingredients such as grape leaves was really fun but also very difficult. The hardest part of it all was getting the leaves out of the jar because they are so tightly packed, it took me a good 10 minutes!
Once you get the hang of the rolling process it really is quite easy and fun.

The recipe for these actually contains 1/4 pound of ground lamb but since I am a vegetarian I just used more rice instead. You can add any ground meat though or maybe try soya or quorn instead. Or you could try different rice's too, I think arborio would be lovely in these but I just didn't have any in the house, or even cous cous!

Recipe: Stuffed Grape Leaves
Time to make- 45 mins prep 1 hour cook
Level- Effort required
Rating: 8/10


Cookbook Reveal – A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Companion Cookbook

A Feast of Ice and Fire was my very first fiction-based cookbook! I started out by routinely visiting the Inn at the Crossroads blog, and when they announced that they were releasing a cookbook I was one of the first to get my hands on it.

To be honest, I’ve already made a ton of recipes from this cookbook, but I made a point to add some new ones to my list this month.

About the Books (& Show):

“A Song of Ice and Fire” is my favorite book series. The series was created by George R.R.

Me on the Iron Throne a few years ago! Did I mention I’m a big fan?

Martin, and it ended up being produced as a television show called “Game of Thrones” (which I’m confident you’ve all heard of). It is a fantasy series set in a world similar to medieval Earth.

The book (and show) focus on several different characters in different parts of the world, most of whom believe they have rights to the Iron Throne. An incredibly huge number of main characters are killed off throughout the books as they fight for the throne, and the series will likely end with everybody dead.

If you haven’t seen the show yet, there’s still time to catch up before the final season airs next year!

About the Cookbook:

The cookbook is divided up by whichever location in “The Known World” they came from (The Wall, The North, The South, King’s Landing, Dorne, and Across the Narrow Sea). I’m including a few recipes from each, since the flavors can differ quite significantly between each location.

Every recipe in this cookbook has been mentioned in the book series at one time or another, even if just in passing, and each recipe starts with the passage that it was inspired from. This is probably what I love most about this cookbook! It’s 100% true to the original material, and doesn’t make up recipes based on what might have been served in a certain location. Lucky for them that George R.R. Martin loves to describe amazing food and meals in his books!

They also provide both a medieval and modern day version of a lot of the recipes in here. With the medieval recipes, the authors actually tracked down some medieval cookbooks for authentic recipes. Some are good, and others don’t really appeal to the modern-day palette. I’m going to make a bit of both.

I could honestly talk forever about this cookbook, but I know you guys are anxious to know what I’m cooking this month!

The Recipes:

BREAKFAST:

  • Breakfast on the Wall (From The Wall)
  • Breakfast at Winterfell (From The North)
  • Breakfast in Dorne (From Dorne)
  • Breakfast in Meereen (From Across the Narrow Sea)
  • Bean-and-Bacon Soup (From The Wall)
  • Beef and Bacon Pie (From The North)
  • Leek Soup (From The South)
  • Bowls of Brown (From King’s Landing)

SIDES/SNACKS:

  • Crusty White Bread (From The Wall)
  • Sweetcorn Fritters (From King’s Landing)
  • Flatbread (From Dorne)
  • Chickpea Paste (From Dorne)
  • Baked Apples (From The North)
  • Arya’s Snitched Tarts (From The South)
  • Poached Pears (From The South)
  • Lemon Cakes (From King’s Landing)

BEVERAGES:


A Game of Thrones-Themed Menu for Your Sunday Viewing Party

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We hope the aftermath of your Game of Thrones party is better than the aftermath of this one. Helen Sloan/HBO

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Indulgence is at the core of Game of Thrones. Snakes crackle over an open flame as the Sand Snakes plot their revenge in Dorne. Oysters glisten in baskets as Arya runs through the streets of Braavos to evade her assassin. Blood-red wine shivers in goblets and pine nuts leap off roasted beets as Cersei pounds her fists in the Red Keep. Meat pies steam on pewter dishes as soldiers sit at the Inn at the Crossroads for one last hot meal before their deaths.

Like sex, food in George R.R. Martin's universe is a way to laugh at the Many-Faced God. Yes, winter is always coming, but there is cheese to eat, and oranges, and fish stew to sop up with crusty bread. (If you're a dragon, there are sheep to fry.) When food is scarce or unappetizing in this world, you know the stakes could not be higher—at the Red Wedding, the first clue something was wrong came in the form of a thin leek soup. As the Night King approaches in season 8, nothing is more portentous than the low granaries at Winterfell.

Now, it is not the Night King who comes but the end of Game of Thrones itself. For eight long years we've waited for the finale that airs Sunday, and it's our duty to send it off dripping in honey, stuffed with the fruits of our labor. Here we present a last-ever Game of Thrones viewing party menu: eight dishes in hedonistic honor of the eight seasons, with fare celebrating the most important places in Westeros and Essos. There's nothing on the menu to represent the Citadel because, gross, all Samwell ate there was slop. Nor is there anything from the Iron Islands, since they proudly produce nothing of their own. To honor Theon and Yara, just snatch what's yours off someone else’s plate—enough to fill your mouth so no one hears you cry as the credits roll.

You cannot send off Game of Thrones without a meat pie. Quintessentially Thronesian, they're cooked in many of the kingdoms, including Essos. The Dothraki version is filled with (horse) blood, of course. A grand pigeon pie is the centerpiece of Joffrey and Margaery's wedding in King's Landing. After Arya murders Walder Frey's sons, she does her best Mrs. Lovett and bakes their flesh into a pie she feeds to their father.

If you want to get serious about this, go for one of the recipes in the official Game of Thrones cookbook, A Feast of Ice and Fire, for which Martin wrote the foreword. (It's almost as though he has time on his hands to write things!) You can pick from: medieval pork, beef and bacon, and pigeon pie, which calls for "five pigeons, cleaned and dressed" and is only available in the cookbook itself. (Bon Appetit helpfully offers an alternative recipe subbing in squab.)

I suggest instead picking a hand pie more conducive to eating on couches in the dark without silverware. You're like a soldier heading up the King's Road to battle—you need something portable and comforting to get you through this night. The modern Cornish or Jamaican beef pasty is ideal, but every cuisine has a meat pie variety, and theyɽ all do: samosas, knishes, empanadas, piroshki, xian bing, etc. Pick one and make (or buy) a lot. (I'm making these, and adding currants.) Make a gravy to dip it in, a hot sauce to douse it in. This is the most crucial dish of your party, a buttery bundle of death and fat.

You must have a cheese platter, and this is your chance to salute the world across the Narrow Sea, as well as the hot southern Dornish lands. Scatter fresh herbs, rich cheeses, pomegranate seeds, cubed watermelon, and olives on your prettiest serving tray. (Extra points for tarnished silver.) Slice crusty bread for dipping, and pretend this isn't the end.

You also need wine. Obviously. To drown your sorrows and, Tyrion-like, wish on the "god of tits and wine." (The Hand of the Queen may have grown dumb, but he drinks just the same. We can't betray him now.) Pick a skin-contact orange, like the sour wines of Dorne a fine red served in some kind of carafe and a good white or grape juice in honor of the best Arbor Golds in Westeros. Also consider pouring a mulled wine: red, hot, spiced, and full of dried-up fruit, like the Old Bear Jeor Mormont likes it. Pull out that Instant Pot you said youɽ use and fill it with two bottles of red, two cinnamon sticks, a handful of raisins, some sliced oranges, a few cloves, a heaping of honey, a tablespoon of fresh ginger, a dash or two of nutmeg, and hey, maybe some black pepper. You could throw some bourbon or cognac or rum in there, too. Cheers!

Look, there's probably a lot of great food in the Vale. But the most iconic is breast milk, suckled for far too long by not-so-little Lord Robin Arryn. Serve a probiotic fermented yogurt drink, like Yakult or shots of kefir with lime zest. Your sober guests will appreciate it, at least—and just for funsies, ask them how long they were breast-fed.

The land that gave Westeros Lady Catelyn Stark—and took her away—is known for its rivers and fish. You could make a seafood Sister's stew, but that's a bit messy in front of a TV. Instead, dish up boquerones, small white anchovies marinated in vinegar they'll pair well with your olives and crackers. You can make them yourself or pick them up at any higher-end market.

As Lady of Winterfell, Sansa has been obsessed with filling her granaries. Rightfully so—the long winter is here and she's got mouths to feed (even after the Night King's rampage). Honor her with a farro salad with roasted beets, the kind of hearty root vegetable that grows well in frigid northern climes.

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Don't forget about the wisest character to ever murder a king, the Queen of Thorns, Lady Olena of House Tyrell. In her memory, craft a finger food that embodies plenty. Highgarden is like the California Central Valley of Westeros it's the fertile bread basket that feeds all the other regions. Pears poached in wine, or a fig tart with blue cheese and honey, should do nicely. "I always take figs mid afternoon they help move the bowels," Lady Olena once said, wisely. The ingredients of Arya's favorite "Snitched" tarts are pure Highgarden, too: nuts, figs, currants, wine, honey. You could combine your love of two badass women by making these. Shell out for fancy ingredients here—remember how offended Lady Olenna was when Tyrion wasn't willing to pay for fancy catering for Margaery's wedding? Don't offend the Queen of Thorns. Her words (and goblets) can kill.

Sansa's fixation on dried foodstuffs may be practical, but her enduring love is for a trifle far more indulgent. As a second dessert, make Sansa's favorite food, the dish she and Margaery ate together in King's Landing back when the show was more Mean Girls than genocidal blood bath: lemon cakes. As the books explain, Sansa is obsessed with them because they represent a food she never got to have growing up (citrus can't grow in the cold). Trader Joe's has frozen bars, if you want to make like the show's creators and cut corners on your way to the inevitable end. Maybe that's the truest way to go out: a little drunk, a little lazy, staring at a black screen with a belly full of ersatz medieval grub. The hangover awaits.


(Spoilers ASOS) The authentic recipe for the tart Arya filches in Harrenhal

„I'm making the morning bread,“ Hot Pie complained. „Anyhow I don't like it when it's dark, I told you.“

„I'm going. I'll tell you after. Can I have a tart?“

„No.“

She filched one anyway, and ate it on her way out. It was stuffed with chopped nuts and fruit and cheese, the crust flaky and still warm from the oven. Eating Ser Amory's tart made Arya feel daring. Barefoot surefoot lightfoot, she sang under her breath. I am the ghost in Harrenhal.

(A Clash of Kings, Arya IX, P. 676)

Though not directly mentioning them, the text offers a relative precisely identificable list of ingredients for the tart that Arya filches from Hot Pie's tray. The Official Game of Thrones Cookbook took up the given text passage and published an entire recipe, but unfortunately without investigating the circumstances within the narration very accurately. The recipe presented by the authors may be an authentic medieval tart recipe, but with the kind of fruit chosen for this variation and the cheese – mentioned in the quote – not even being considered, it is not applicable to the background of the ingredients enumerated by Arya.

To reconstruct the exact ingredients of the tart, the political and environmental situation of Harrenhal needs to be examined first. Afterwards the acquired characteristics and conditions shall be applied to the mentioned categories of ɼhopped nuts', ɿruit', ɼheese' and ɼrust' as well as to the shape of the tart.

Harrenhal – with its imense burned towers – is seated prominently north of the God's Eye, west of the King's Road and south of the Trident in the „rich and fertile“ (The World of Ice & Fire, p. 151) Riverlands. Being called the „beating heart of Westeros“ (TWOIAF, p. 151) the Riverlands had faced many battles and overthrown reigns over the centuries, caused by uprising houses and Lords trying to seize the wealthy lands. Watered by the Trident and its three branches (Red, Green and Blue Fork) – also serving as a means of transport and thereby promoting a flourishing trade – the climate of the Riverlands is likely to resemble the mild and fertile central european climate, causing a similar flora as well. This makes the lands suitable for „settlement, farming and conquest“ (TWOIAF, p. 151), suggesting an especially rural landscape – mostly farms and fishing villages with small holdfasts as described in A Clash of Kings (p. 140f.).

When Arya is taken to Harrenhal, the castle is held by Lord Tywin Lannister and his host, which is encamped outside of the castle walls. The enormous building had been held by Lady Whent „as bannermen to House Tully“ (ACOK, p. 456) before she fled. When seized by Tywin Lannister, „only the lower thirds of two of the five towers“ (ACOK, p. 456) were in use and the rest had been left to „go to ruin“ (ACOK, p. 456). The „small household“ (ACOK, p. 456) left by Lady Whent and the servants captured by the Lannisters could scarcely tend to the numerous chambers and halls of Harrenhal, eventhough it was said, that Tywin Lannister was about to „restore [the castle] to glory“ (ACOK, p. 456). It is repeatedly mentioned that – being at war with the north and the Tullys – castle and host are sustained be foraging (ACOK, p. 456, 465). Lord Tywin has Ser Gregor and Vargo Hoat foraging and burning the fields, farms and villages of the Riverlands (ACOK, p. 289, 465, 677) and bringing back „servants as well as […] plunder and provender“ (ACOK, p. 456).

When Tywin and the host march, he leaves the castle to Ser Amory Lorch as castellan of Harrenhal (ACOK, p. 549) and a small garrison of about a hundred men (ACOK, p. 679) to hold it. With Lord Tywin and the host leaving only so small a garrison, it is highly probable, that, if there had been any food of a different origin than the riverlands within the castle, besides the supplies obtained by foraging, those had been taken with the Lord of Casterly Rock due to their value. This leads to the conclusion, that at the point in time when Arya filches the tart - which is when Tywin has left Ser Amory in charge - all the supplies in the castle need to be local and obtainable by foraging. Regarding the ingredients of the tart, this suggests the following consideration: Beginning with the mentioned ‚chopped nuts‘, all the sorts of nuts that are only growing outside of a central european-like climate can be excluded. The kind of nuts taken into consideration need to be grown on local farms or picked in the woods of the riverlands by villagers, to be foraged and brought to Harrenhal by the Lannisters‘ bannermen. This leaves hazelnut, walnut and almonds for examination, being able to grow in the said climate, either in the woods or in gardens. Of those the almond is very improbable to be found by foraging, because although they do grow in the kind of climate the riverlands provide, they are grown in warmer regions more easily and due to a very water- and timeconsuming (and thereby expensive) cultivation, they are not very likely to be grown by small farmers around Harrenhal. This leaves only hazelnut and walnut. Taking into account that the term ‚chopped nuts‘ is used instead of directly mentioning the sort, it suggests that there are at least two sorts of nuts. On page 123 in ACOK there are „pecans“ mentioned when the ingredients of the supper Tyrion shares with Lord Janos Slynt are enumerated, suggesting that if there had been only one sort of nut in the tart, it would have been named directly. From this can be concluded that the nuts used for the tart need to be hazelnut and walnut.

The same line of argumentation applies to the ‚fruit‘ used for the tart. The fruit need to be found in the lands around Harrenhal to be seized by foraging, which excludes all types of citrus fruit and other sun-loving fruit from the south. The fruit need not only be locally grown, but also storable over longer periods of time without spoiling. The foragers return just after Arya ate the tart (ACOK, p. 677), so supposedly it has been several days since the last arrival of plunder. Due to the unlikeliness of a servant being send to pick fresh fruit from trees and bushes that would have been found quite far off (with the imense host lingering around the castle before and probably eating everything they could find off the land) the used fruit in the tart had been stored at Harrenhal. In A Storm of Swords Lord Bolton offers Jamie prunes, taken „from an inn before [Vargo Hoat] burned it“ (ASOS, p. 510). Those can be excluded for two different reasons: as already mentioned, the last arrival of plunder supposedly arrived days before the tart was made, so even if there had been any prunes at that time available around Harrenhal, they would have been used up days before the tart or spoiled. Secondly, autumn was not as advanced in ACOK as in ASOS, so it likely might not even have been prune-season yet.

Excluding all fruit from other climatic areas and easily spoiling fruit from the riverlands leaves apples and pears, which not only can be stored in cellars over a longer period of time, but are also explicitly mentioned before to be found at Harrenhal (ACOK, p. 456, 894). Like in the line of argumentation for the nuts, the term ‚fruit‘ indicates that at least two sorts are used for the tart, due to a specifically named „apple tart“ before (ACOK, p. 456). Dried fruit like raisins can also be excluded, because they, too, are mentioned seperately in the text (ACOK, p. 845), leaving apples and pears as the ‚fruit‘ in the tart.

Identifying the kind of cheese used for the tart is more difficult. The argument of the generalizing term (nuts and fruit) used to indicate the use of more than one sort does not apply here, because the text never uses explicit names of cheese, but describes it as „sharp cheese“ (ACOK, p. 125), „hard cheese“ (ACOK, p. 737), „yellow cheese“ (ACOK, p. 138) and „ripe blue cheese“ (ACOK, p. 553). This means the cheese can only be identified roughly by examining the text. Some sorts can be excluded right away though: the very hard cheeses are usually used for long journeys, due to not spoiling easily (ACOK, p. 737). Considering that Ser Amory Lorch is neither Lord nor commander of a large garrison, but is still a knight and likely has a demand of at least slightly better (eventhough foraged) food, it is improbable that his food is made with a journey-cheese. All soft cream cheeses can be excluded as well, due to their high percentage of spoil-supporting water, leaving some sort of storable, neither too soft or hard medium-matured cheese with a low proportion of water to avoid spoiling. Also cheeses made of milk other than cow milk are to be excluded, due to the text explicitly mentioning „goat cheese“ (ACOK, p. 849). To make a suggestion which cheese could probably have been used, a special habit of serving pie needs to be examined. The tradition of serving nuts, fruit and cheese at the end of a meal can be traced back to ancient times. It usually was taken after the supper, with the main meal taken in the afternoon. Gradually those meals were fused, combining main meal and the habit of eating nuts, fruit and cheese at the end of it. This fusion is said to be the origin of a tradition combining an apple pie with a slice of cheddar cheese, first found in England and later brought to the US by the settlers. Considering that tarts were „more often than not, a mixture of“ sweet and savory, this combination can be a hint to the sort of cheese used for the tart Arya filches, which, too, contains apples and therefore can be seen as a variation of this tradition. The cheddar fits to the characteristics examined earlier, suggesting that the cheese used might be a cheddar-like one.

With Arya calling the crust „flaky“ (ACOK, p. 676) the dough can be identified as puff pastry, which is of a flaky consistency due to multiple foldings of the dough during the production. Early pie- and tartcrusts were used as containers (called ‚coffins‘) made only of flour and water. The food was wrapped in the dough to contain moisture and flavor, but the crust itself was seldom eaten at first. In the middle ages the bakers started adding fat like lard or butter for the crust to be consumed as well. The puff pastry developed during the Renaissance as a variation of the crust, especially preferred by the nobility as it was very time-consuming in production and required a special-skilled baker. Only containing the simple ingredients of flour, water and butter (which can be found in Harrenhal, ACOK, p. 677, 687) but being rather complex in production, the puff pastry corresponds perfectly with the position of Ser Amory (for whom the tart was initially baked) as a knight with a certain demand of quality in food but commanding only a small garrison that is sustained by foraging the surrounding lands.

As to the shape of the tart the text only gives few hints. Food historians explain the tart as an uncovered variation of the pie, offering the possibility to show the often colorful fillings. Considering that Arya is able to just filch one and eat it while walking, it needs to be rather small. Additionally it is more likely to be covered because the filling of chopped nuts, fruit and cheese would have easily fallen out of it while filching if it were uncovered. Another hint given by the text states that the tarts are being carried and served in baskets (ACOK, p. 686), very likely stacked inside them. This also supports the theory of the covered tarts to be stacked and carried more easily without falling apart.

As a summary it can be stated that due to the circumstances given in the narration, the tart that Arya filches from Hot Pie‘s tray is a small covered puff pastry tart stuffed with chopped hazel- and walnuts, apples, pears and a cheddar-like cheese.

1 Apple (for authentic tarts preferably a storable sort like Boskop, otherwise a good baking apple like Granny Smith or as preferred)

1 Pear (for authentic tarts preferably a storable sort like Williams Christ, otherwise as preferred)

Cheddar cheese (ground or in slices)

Peel, core and dice the apple and the pear. Chop the hazel- and walnuts not too finely for a nicer crunch. Simmer with a tbsp of butter over medium-low heat until lightly softened and remove from heat. Roll out the puff pastry with a rolling pin evenly until about 1mm thick and cut into rectangles of approximately 12x12cm/4,5 inches in size. Place about 2 tbsp of the fruit-and-nut-filling on one half of the rectangle not too close to the edges. Top the filling-mounds with a generous slice of cheddar. Now fold the empty half of the rectangle over the mound and seal by pressing the edges of the dough together with a fork. Lightly slit the tarts crosswise twice. Brush down with melted butter and bake at 200°C/ 400°F until goldenbrown and crispy.

TLDR: If you want to taste the real flavor of the warring riverlands, you can now bake an authentic version of Arya's tart of Harrenhal.

Also, I am no native speaker and hope you will excuse any language inconsistencies.

Martin, George R. R.: A Clash of Kings. New York 2011.

Martin, George R. R.: A Storm of Swords. New York 2011.

Martin/ Garcia/ Antonsson: The World of Ice and Fire. The untold history of Westeros and the Game of Thrones. New York 2014.


A Feast of Ice and Fire: Elizabethan Lemon Cakes

A review of “Elizabethan Lemon Cakes” from the A Feast of Ice and Fire cookbook.

The next few recipes I’m making are from King’s Landing, the capital of Westeros. It’s the most populated city in Westeros, but also the dirtiest.

Since it’s the Capital, those living in the Red Keep receive food as “taxes” from the rest of Westeros. Everyone living in the slums of King’s Landing, however, must work hard for the little food they can manage, or resort to thievery. So while the wealthy are dining on pheasant and tarts and other amazing goodies, the poor folks are surviving on “Bowls of Brown,” a stew made of street rats, murder victims, any other meat or vegetables they can get their hands on.

Don’t worry…I will definitely be trying the Bowls of Brown recipe for you later this week!

Elizabethan Lemon Cakes

“Later came sweetbreads and pigeon pie and baked apples fragrant with cinnamon and lemon cakes frosted in sugar, but by then Sansa was so stuffed that she could not manage more than two little lemon cakes, as much as she loved them.’ – A Game of Thrones

I couldn’t make recipes from “A Song of Ice and Fire” without trying Sansa’s FAVORITE food: Lemon cakes!

She can be seen eating them in several scenes in the show, as well as countless times throughout the books.

This recipe is from the Elizabethan era, presumably because the authors couldn’t find a relevant recipe from the Medieval ages.

They were quite easy to make.

First, all of the ingredients were combined in a bowl (flour, sugar, butter, lemon zest, and eggs). The mixture was quite crumbly, even though the recipe said I might need to add flour to make it “less sticky.” My dough was definitely not sticky at all.

Next, I formed them into little balls. I was worried that they would fall apart because the dough was so crumbly, but it turned out they held together quite well!

Then the balls of dough were tossed in the oven until slightly golden.

Once they were cool, an icing was made using confectioner’s sugar and a little bit of milk. I had to add a dash more milk than what was called for.

The icing sugar was drizzled over the cookies, and voila! Lemon cakes!

I’m calling these cookies, not cakes. They are closer to the consistency of a dense cake, but the size of little cookies.

And they were so tasty! The lemon flavor was light and subtle.

I tried one before I put the icing on, and it was just as good, so you can save a few calories (and some time) by eliminating the icing if you’d like.

Taste: 10/10

These are so great, and VERY addictive! We’ve almost gone through all of them already. They have a mild lemon flavor, and though they are sweet, they are not overwhelmingly so.

They are more cookie-like to me, with a consistency similar to a dense cake. The outside layer is hard, while the inside is soft.

Difficulty: Easy

A very easy recipe to make that just requires mixing everything together in a bowl and forming them into balls. There is some lemon grating and baking required, but nothing difficult.

Cost: Cheap

I just needed to purchase a lemon for this recipe, though you may need to purchase confectioner’s sugar if you don’t already have it. The rest of the ingredients are pretty basic and probably already in your pantry/fridge.

You can exclude the icing if you’d like. While these do look really nice with the icing and it adds a little bit of sweetness, they are quite sweet on their own and the icing isn’t really needed.


Game of Thrones: Samwell’s Blueberry Tart

Sam loved to listen to music and make his own songs, to wear soft velvets, to play in the castle kitchen beside the cooks, drinking in the rich smells as he snitched lemon cakes and blueberry tarts.

For some reason, I’ve had been stocked with blueberries that last few weeks. I’ve been eating it with my oatmeal in the morning and as a snack. It was about time I would get tired of the fruit but it finally occurred to me that there were a few blueberry recipes from my lift of Game of Thrones dishes! Interestingly enough, I don’t think I’ve ever made a blueberry tart before. I wanted to keep things simple since the blueberries were incredibly delicious and sweet. I already know this tart is something I would dream about in the near future. The blueberries were tart with just the perfect amount of sweetness but the most amazing part was the crust. I’m usually the person that scoops out all the fruit from the pie or tart but the crust on this was incredibly.

You seriously have to try it. I ate a slice myself and regretfully gave the rest to my parents. I think it’s safe to assume I’ll be making this in the near future. Please enjoy.


Arya's Snitched Tarts - Recipes

Why the Writing in Game of Thrones' Season 8 Feels Off

Like sex, food in George R.R. Martin's universe is a way to laugh at the Many-Faced God. Yes, winter is always coming, but there is cheese to eat, and oranges, and fish stew to sop up with crusty bread. (If you're a dragon, there are sheep to fry.) When food is scarce or unappetizing in this world, you know the stakes could not be higher&mdashat the Red Wedding, the first clue something was wrong came in the form of a thin leek soup. As the Night King approaches in season 8, nothing is more portentous than the low granaries at Winterfell.

Now, it is not the Night King who comes but the end of Game of Thrones itself. For eight long years we've waited for the finale that airs Sunday, and it's our duty to send it off dripping in honey, stuffed with the fruits of our labor. Here we present a last-ever Game of Thrones viewing party menu: eight dishes in hedonistic honor of the eight seasons, with fare celebrating the most important places in Westeros and Essos. There's nothing on the menu to represent the Citadel because, gross, all Samwell ate there was slop. Nor is there anything from the Iron Islands, since they proudly produce nothing of their own. To honor Theon and Yara, just snatch what's yours off someone else&rsquos plate&mdashenough to fill your mouth so no one hears you cry as the credits roll.

Meat Pies (Every Region of Westeros and Essos)

You cannot send off Game of Thrones without a meat pie. Quintessentially Thronesian, they're cooked in many of the kingdoms, including Essos. The Dothraki version is filled with (horse) blood, of course. A grand pigeon pie is the centerpiece of Joffrey and Margaery's wedding in King's Landing. After Arya murders Walder Frey's sons, she does her best Mrs. Lovett and bakes their flesh into a pie she feeds to their father.

If you want to get serious about this, go for one of the recipes in the official Game of Thrones cookbook, A Feast of Ice and Fire, for which Martin wrote the foreword. (It's almost as though he has time on his hands to write things!) You can pick from: medieval pork, beef and bacon, and pigeon pie, which calls for "five pigeons, cleaned and dressed" and is only available in the cookbook itself. (Bon Appetit helpfully offers an alternative recipe subbing in squab.)

I suggest instead picking a hand pie more conducive to eating on couches in the dark without silverware. You're like a soldier heading up the King's Road to battle&mdashyou need something portable and comforting to get you through this night. The modern Cornish or Jamaican beef pasty is ideal, but every cuisine has a meat pie variety, and theyɽ all do: samosas, knishes, empanadas, piroshki, xian bing, etc. Pick one and make (or buy) a lot. (I'm making these, and adding currants.) Make a gravy to dip it in, a hot sauce to douse it in. This is the most crucial dish of your party, a buttery bundle of death and fat.

Bread, Cheese, and Fruit (Essos and Dorne)

You must have a cheese platter, and this is your chance to salute the world across the Narrow Sea, as well as the hot southern Dornish lands. Scatter fresh herbs, rich cheeses, pomegranate seeds, cubed watermelon, and olives on your prettiest serving tray. (Extra points for tarnished silver.) Slice crusty bread for dipping, and pretend this isn't the end.

Wine, Wine, Wine (Everywhere)

You also need wine. Obviously. To drown your sorrows and, Tyrion-like, wish on the "god of tits and wine." (The Hand of the Queen may have grown dumb, but he drinks just the same. We can't betray him now.) Pick a skin-contact orange, like the sour wines of Dorne a fine red served in some kind of carafe and a good white or grape juice in honor of the best Arbor Golds in Westeros. Also consider pouring a mulled wine: red, hot, spiced, and full of dried-up fruit, like the Old Bear Jeor Mormont likes it. Pull out that Instant Pot you said youɽ use and fill it with two bottles of red, two cinnamon sticks, a handful of raisins, some sliced oranges, a few cloves, a heaping of honey, a tablespoon of fresh ginger, a dash or two of nutmeg, and hey, maybe some black pepper. You could throw some bourbon or cognac or rum in there, too. Cheers!

Milk (The Vale)

Look, there's probably a lot of great food in the Vale. But the most iconic is breast milk, suckled for far too long by not-so-little Lord Robin Arryn. Serve a probiotic fermented yogurt drink, like Yakult or shots of kefir with lime zest. Your sober guests will appreciate it, at least&mdashand just for funsies, ask them how long they were breast-fed.

Fish (The Riverlands and Eastern Westeros)

The land that gave Westeros Lady Catelyn Stark&mdashand took her away&mdashis known for its rivers and fish. You could make a seafood Sister's stew, but that's a bit messy in front of a TV. Instead, dish up boquerones, small white anchovies marinated in vinegar they'll pair well with your olives and crackers. You can make them yourself or pick them up at any higher-end market.

Beet and Grain Salad (The North)

As Lady of Winterfell, Sansa has been obsessed with filling her granaries. Rightfully so&mdashthe long winter is here and she's got mouths to feed (even after the Night King's rampage). Honor her with a farro salad with roasted beets, the kind of hearty root vegetable that grows well in frigid northern climes.

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Tarts (The Reach)

Don't forget about the wisest character to ever murder a king, the Queen of Thorns, Lady Olena of House Tyrell. In her memory, craft a finger food that embodies plenty. Highgarden is like the California Central Valley of Westeros it's the fertile bread basket that feeds all the other regions. Pears poached in wine, or a fig tart with blue cheese and honey, should do nicely. "I always take figs mid afternoon they help move the bowels," Lady Olena once said, wisely. The ingredients of Arya's favorite "Snitched" tarts are pure Highgarden, too: nuts, figs, currants, wine, honey. You could combine your love of two badass women by making these. Shell out for fancy ingredients here&mdashremember how offended Lady Olenna was when Tyrion wasn't willing to pay for fancy catering for Margaery's wedding? Don't offend the Queen of Thorns. Her words (and goblets) can kill.

Lemon Cakes (King's Landing)

Sansa's fixation on dried foodstuffs may be practical, but her enduring love is for a trifle far more indulgent. As a second dessert, make Sansa's favorite food, the dish she and Margaery ate together in King's Landing back when the show was more Mean Girls than genocidal blood bath: lemon cakes. As the books explain, Sansa is obsessed with them because they represent a food she never got to have growing up (citrus can't grow in the cold). Trader Joe's has frozen bars, if you want to make like the show's creators and cut corners on your way to the inevitable end. Maybe that's the truest way to go out: a little drunk, a little lazy, staring at a black screen with a belly full of ersatz medieval grub. The hangover awaits.


Game of Thrones: Arya’s Fruit and Cheese Tart

She filched one anyway, and ate it on her way out. It was stuffed with chopped nuts and fruit and cheese, the crust flaky and still warm from the oven. Eating Ser Amory’s tart made Arya feel daring. Barefoot surefoot lightfoot, she sang under her breath. I am the ghost in Harrenhal.

A Clash of Kings

For those caught up with the newest season of Game of Thrones, I just want to say, I’m so excited to see where Arya’s story is going to go! She is so incredibly strong and I can’t wait for the Starks to make a come back. While we wait to find out, today’s recipe is for Arya’s fruit and cheese tart from Harrenhal. I’ve played around this recipe a few times and this was the one I’ve gotten a lot of good feedback from. This tart is slightly sweet and tart from the fruit and flaky from the crust. It’s so easy to put together so I hope you enjoy this recipe!

The Game of Thrones: Arya’s Fruit and Cheese Tart

yield: 6 tarts prep time: 45 minutes total time: 1 hour and 30 minutes

  • 250g all purpose flour, sifted
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp granulated sugar
  • 60g cold butter, sliced
  • 10g vegetable shortening
  • 4-5 oz ice cold water
  • 80g diced granny smith apples, 1/4″ diced
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 40g raisins
  • 40g cranberries
  • 60g rough chopped almonds and walnuts
  • 40g goat cheese
  • 35g cream cheese
  • orange zest
  • 2 tbsp honey
  1. Preheat oven to 350F.
  2. In a bowl, combine your flour, salt, sugar, and vegetable shortening. With your fingers, start to work the shortening into the flour until it develops very fine and small crumbs. Add your cold sliced butter and work it in with your fingers. Stop when the butter is around the size of hazelnuts. This will help create flaky layers. Add enough cold water until all the flour is hydrated and the dough just comes together. Plastic wrap and place into the refrigerator to rest for 30-45 minutes.
  3. In a bowl, combine all your ingredients for the filling. You can use any mixture of nuts you have on hand. I like the combination of the goat and cream cheese because it was slightly tart and gave it a slightly chewy center.
  4. Once your dough has rested, portion out the dough into 40-60g balls. This will depend on the size of tart shells you are using. Mine were 3″ in diameter and 1/2″ in depth. Roll out each ball of dough on a slightly floured surface according to the size of the tart shells you are using. Press in the edges and corners gently with your fingers. Refrigerate for 10 minutes.
  5. Fill each tart with the filling. Bake for 15-20 minutes until golden brown. Dust with powdered sugar and serve warm.

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Watch the video: Tyroshi Honeyfingers Honey biscuits of Lord Caswell the south Game of Thrones recipes (July 2022).


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